Productivity

Meditations minus the ommm part

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3 morning activities for a more productive day

There’s a half-hour slot in my morning schedule I call “Meditations” (thanks, Marcus Aurelius!).

It’s composed of three meditative activities which I now consider pillars of a productive day: mindfulness meditation, mental prayer, and journaling. Without these, it seems, I’d feel my day quite directionless, limbo-like, chaotic. You might want to try them.

Mindfulness meditation — or, simply, meditation — involves closing my eyes and becoming conscious of my bodily processes — my breathing, primarily, but also how the muscles on my face relax, and those on my neck, my shoulders, my torso, and so on. (No ommms, though, because that’s too much weirdness I can take.) I normally use Simple Habit to do this; it’s an app with great meditations addressing various issues like stress and insomnia, but also mundane stuff like getting a cup of coffee or taking a break from work or getting ready for sexy time lol. Meditating normally takes 10 minutes.

 

 

Mental prayer is simply reading some Gospel passage and a short commentary on it, and then talking to God about it — or other things like wishing the day would be great or complaining about getting neither Argentina nor Spain nor Germany(!) in the World’s Cup’s Final Four. I use iPray with the Gospel to help me with this. Time allotted: 10–15 minutes.

 

 

Journaling is, of course, just writing down (in my bullet journal) a more coherent version of my thoughts — my hopes and dreams and frustrations and disappointments, but also confusions and conundrums and manifestations of the Inside Out characters. Towards the end, there’s a part where I list three people I’m grateful for (and why), then two things I look forward to in the day (normally my day’s key goal and, often, “sleep”), and finally one lesson I get from Ryan Holiday’s Daily Stoic book. Allotted time: 10 minutes.

One or two of these may not be useful to you. But I suggest you try at least one. A little introspection — getting to know yourself — goes a long way in cultivating friendship with yourself…and others as a result.

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Productivity

What’s great about keeping a bullet journal

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The back cover of my bujo goes straight to the point.

I once had trouble understanding Ryder Carroll’s explanation of the Bullet Journal method, which he invented.

So I tried it out.

Behold, the impression of complexity was just a phase. When I started creating my modules and went on with my daily logs (including my notes of feelings and ideas and late-blooming teenager-y angst lol), I got hooked.

It was January. Now, six months later, my humble, tattered bujo is ready to be shelved. It is filled to the last page.

I cannot say I’ve been super-productive the whole time I was using the bujo system. I can vouch, however, for its service as a life organizer, a soul mirror, an aide-memoire.

 

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I try! 😝

So what’s so great about keeping a bujo?

  1. You can progress through the journal logically (that is, from page 1 then 2 then 3 and so on). No need to segment the book into various sections (except the index). This is important to me because I dislike blank pages, which are a waste if not filled in. The logical progression also makes for easy navigation among the pages. And if you get lost, then there’s the index for you, bud.
  2. A physical — and I mean tangible — manifestation of my thoughts is kind of…romantic and esteem-boosting. It makes you think you’re writing a book, or leaving an artifact for the historians of 2200 AD.
  3. It strikes between final and tentative. Final because your pen’s ink isn’t erasable — and tentative because, hey, you can still strike through your mistakes! It’s forgiving, and it’s how we should be to others and to ourselves, too.
  4. There’s something charming about creating your habit trackers or monthly log at the end of each month: it’s a continual call to begin again, to be young once more, somehow.
  5. It’s organic, duh. You can burn your bujo and leave nothing in the environment except ash, which symbolizes the transience of life and the supremacy of the soul. Bam!

If you’re interested to know more about bullet journaling, head on to bulletjournal.com. Don’t let the fancy designs on Pinterest intimidate you. You can keep your bujo minimalist like I do. Freedom and simplicity is the name of the game: do what works best for you.

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